Human clinical studies prove the effectiveness of the bioresonance therapy  

 

The last few years, in particular, have seen the conducting of a number of controlled human studies of bioresonance therapy that have demonstrated the effectiveness of the method even using this empirical form of testing. The Appendix presents an overview of the studies of which I am aware by indication, author, title, journal, and design (study type).

The majority of these studies are discussed below with reference to their results. It is not possible or indeed intended, for this brief discussion to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the studies. For this, I recommend a detailed examination of the relevant publications.

In 1990 and 1991, Schumacher (1998) conducted two prospective, uncontrolled studies of allergies and intolerance as indications. The 1990 study, in particular, examined the effect of bioresonance therapy on allergic skin conditions (e.g. neurodermatitis) and allergen-inhalation conditions (e.g. bronchial asthma) during the allergen-free period. Hay fever patients were excluded. According to Schumacher, 83% of patients were able to tolerate the allergen without reacting, 5 months after the end of the course of treatments and in 11% of patients there had been a marked improvement in the allergy. The study participants were principally children and adolescents.

The 1991 study examined the effects of bioresonance therapy exclusively in hay fever patients (principally children). The treatments were carried out during the allergen-free period. According to Schumacher, after the first pollen season following bioresonance therapy, 43.4% of patients were no longer experiencing any symptoms of hay fever, 15.9% had only mild residual symptoms on isolated days and 34.5% had observed an improvement but were still experiencing some marked residual symptoms. According to Schumacher, the permanent success of the therapy is possible only if each bioresonance treatment is restricted to a single allergen. Neither study reported any side effects or complications of the bioresonance therapy.

Schumacher’s studies confirmed the positive individual case reports obtained in allergy patients by Morell and many others but attracted vehement criticism from Austrian doctors because the results were unbelievably positive and the studies were not conducted with a comparable control group. They did not meet the requirements of “evidence-based medicine”.

The Austrian doctors then conducted two controlled studies (Kofler et al. 1996, Schöni et al. 1997) to verify Schumacher’s results.

The study by Kofler et al. with hay fever patients produced contradictory results. According to the subjective statements of the patients, the participants experienced a 52.3% improvement in well-being. These results, therefore, concord largely with those of Schumacher. However, as far as objective data are concerned, e.g. nasal challenge, bioresonance therapy produced no improvement according to Kofler et al. For an explanation of this contradiction, reference should be made to Galle (2002). According to this author, the methodology used in the Kofler study, including the use of the classic allergy concept as a measure of the bioresonance allergy concept, does not make sense. Kofler et al. did not report any side effects.

Schöni et al. documented a two to three times greater mean improvement in children with neurodermatitis in the bioresonance therapy group compared with the control group in relation to the three most important end-points (total Costa score and pruritus score). Therefore, a clear mean improvement was achieved with the bioresonance therapy in comparison to the placebo group. However, according to Schöni et al., these differences are not significant at the 5% probability of error level. In my opinion, Schöni et al. are obscuring the effectiveness of the bioresonance method through inappropriate statistical analysis.  To take one example, if the before and after mean values for the total Costa score are checked for significant differences using a t-test, the change produced by the bioresonance therapy is significant, whereas the change produced by the placebo treatment is not.

The two studies by Kofler et al. and Schöni et al. appear, on the basis of the methodology and the statistical analysis method used, to be designed to make the bioresonance method look ineffective. In neither study were any side effects reported.

However, Schumacher’s positive results were endorsed by Chervinskaya et al. (1997), who conducted an extensive controlled study of the effect of the bioresonance method on allergies and respiratory diseases.  Through a complex assessment of effectiveness before and after the bioresonance therapy, involving a whole series of subjective and objective assessments, they concluded that the degree of effectiveness of the bioresonance therapy is very good in 25% of patients, good in 42%, and satisfactory in 21%. This result is much better than the result obtained in the control group. These authors, too, reported no side effects of the bioresonance therapy.

Newly Cheng et al. (2008 and 2008) gave further evidence for the clinical efficacy of the bioresonance therapy and the therapy with electronic homeopathic remedies on allergic symptoms in two uncontrolled studies. The last mentioned study confirms the study of Schuller and Galle (2007) with regard to the clinical efficacy of electronic stored bioactive substances.

In 2004 and 2005 Chinese physicians published a lot of studies about allergic diseases done with the bioresonance method. They were carried out at hospitals and universities. The controlled trials against comparative groups of Huang et al. (2005) and Yang and Zhang (2004) with children give great evidence for the efficacy of the bioresonance method in allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma. In non-controlled studies Xu et al. (2005), Feng et al. (2005), Zhang et al. (2005) und Du et al. (2005) demonstrate significant effectiveness in urticaria, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and skin eczema. These studies confirm the positive studies done by European physicians and scientists with regard to allergic diseases.

A number of Russian studies examined the effect of the bioresonance method in rheumatic conditions.

Maiko and Gogoleva (2000) conducted a controlled study of the effectiveness of bioresonance therapy in arthrosis (mainly osteoarthritis of the knee). According to their clinical assessment (complex parameter calculated from joint pain, joint function, blood analysis, well-being and fitness to work), the bioresonance treatment produced a clear and significant improvement from 57.5% to 94.0% in the test subjects, compared with purely conventional treatment.   In relation to arthrosonography, bioresonance treatment brought about a marked and significant improvement in therapeutic success (reduction in synovitis and tendinitis) from 32.5% to 75.0% in the test subjects, compared with purely conventional treatment. The therapeutic effect in the group that received the bioresonance treatment was much longer and more persistent. According to the authors, bioresonance therapy is well-tolerated and has no side effects.

Gogoleva (2001) studied bioresonance therapy in fibromyalgia patients. They compared a group receiving manual therapy with a group receiving manual therapy and bioresonance therapy. In both groups, there was a clear and significant therapeutic effect, but in the bioresonance group the therapeutic effect was more frequent, significantly earlier, more marked and longer-lasting in respect of all the parameters recorded. The muscle syndrome index (complex parameter of muscle pain) improved by 37% in the control group and by 72.4% in the bioresonance group.  There was also a marked and significant improvement in concurrent symptoms of fibromyalgia, e.g. disturbed sleep pattern and sensitivity to the weather, compared with the control group.

Two controlled Russian studies (Islamov et al. 1998 and 2002) documented changes in cellular biochemistry as a result of bioresonance therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Heat shock protein (stress protein) synthesis is reduced in rheumatoid arthritis patients. A similar reduction in protein synthesis is typical of all lymphocyte proteins. This indicates that reduced heat shock protein synthesis in the presence of rheumatoid arthritis is nonspecific and reflects a general dysfunction of the immuno-competent cells, accompanied by disturbances in non-specific protective mechanisms against harmful factors, e.g. hypoxia and immune complexes. Bioresonance therapy normalizes the 60% reduction in heat shock protein synthesis in lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Islamov et al. 1998 surmise that the therapeutic effect of bioresonance therapy in rheumatoid arthritis is achieved by the restoration of functional lymphocyte activity in relation to the normalization of heat shock protein synthesis.

In 2002, Islamov et al. measured superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione-peroxidase activity, as well as the level of non-protein-containing thiol groups (reduced glutathione) in the circulating lymphocytes of rheumatoid arthritis patients before and after bioresonance therapy. The state of the antioxidant system in the lymphocytes of patients receiving normal pharmacological treatment (diclofenac, prednisolone, etc.) was characterized by activation of antioxidant key enzymes and a reduced thiol group level.  Bioresonance therapy increased the reduced glutathione level and normalized superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity. Catalase activity remained unchanged. These changes in the antioxidant system of lymphocytes indicate that bioresonance therapy activates non-specific biochemical protection mechanisms in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

Both publications by Islamov et al. stress that the physical and biochemical mechanism of action of bioresonance therapy is unclear.

The biochemical non-specificity of the bioresonance effect is an important result from these two studies. Biochemically non-specific protective mechanisms are activated in the cells. The physical mechanism of action and its effects at a biochemical level cannot be demonstrated experimentally. In theory, we are still currently dependent on hypotheses.

However, the non-specific biochemical effect of bioresonance therapy observed does fit a possible physical/biochemical model (being prepared for publication): We surmise that superweak electromagnetic interactions of this kind act – at least in part – on the biochemistry of the cell via what is known as entropic forces. The electromagnetic information changes the entropic situation in the cell and therefore activates biochemical self-regulation programmes non-specifically in relation to the electromagnetic information.

In a controlled study, Nienhaus (2006) investigated the effect of bioresonance therapy on functional gastro-intestinal symptoms. The bioresonance therapy produced a marked and significant effect, in comparison to the placebo group, on the subjective symptoms, physical examination results, temperament, and the conductance sector measurement. The mean score for the collated primary end-points (subjective symptoms, physical examination results) improved by 48.2% in the bioresonance group and by only 3.8% in the placebo group. The results confirm an uncontrolled practice study of psychosomatic disorders published by Nienhaus in 1999. The author reported no side effects.

The controlled study by Saweljew et al. (2001) examined the effect of bioresonance therapy on children and adolescents with allergy-induced bronchial asthma. According to the authors, bioresonance therapy significantly reduces the number, duration, and severity of episodes as well as the daily dose of bronchodilators and corticosteroids in comparison to the control group. According to the results of functional examination methods, the bronchial patency parameters improved significantly.  Furthermore, a reduction in the histamine sensitivity of the bronchi, a reduction in exercise-induced bronchospasm and an increase in general physical fitness to work was documented. The bioresonance therapy had no negative effects on the children and adolescents, according to the authors.

Trofimow et al. (1997) conducted a controlled study of bioresonance therapy in patients with obstructive airways diseases. The end-point was a complex assessment of effectiveness before and after treatment, including subjective and objective findings. According to the authors, more positive, more complete, and longer-lasting results of the most diverse degrees were achieved in the bioresonance group than in the control group in the majority of patients. Compared with the control group, more positive treatment results were obtained in a shorter period of time and the drug dosages used were markedly reduced.

Machowinski and Kreisl (1999) conducted a controlled study of bioresonance therapy in patients with a mild chronic liver disease. End-points were serum AST, ALT, and gamma-GT enzyme activity. The authors documented that bioresonance therapy was able to induce the reconstitution of damaged cells in the presence of mild liver damage. As a result of bioresonance treatment, the mean AST enzyme activity fell by 42% in 12 weeks (untreated control: -4%), that of ALT by 50% (untreated control: -5%) and that of gamma-GT by 38% (untreated control: -7%). Therefore, it was within the upper range of normal after treatment.

Papcz and Barpvic (1999) conducted a controlled study in elite athletes suffering from overuse syndrome, which often leads to increased injury. Within a relatively short time and with few treatment sessions, better results were achieved in the group receiving the bioresonance therapy than in the control group, which was treated using standard conventional methods. In the control group, there was a mean reduction in pain severity from 5.25 points before the therapy to 2.60 points afterward, compared in the bioresonance group with 5.41 points before the therapy and 0.61 points afterward.

The comparative study by Wille (1999) showed bioresonance therapy to have no effect under the prevailing conditions in stuttering children. However, Wille stressed another important finding of the study, “… that the phenomenon of stuttering does not lend itself to the study of an alternative medicine method, …”.

It is important that in this type of study, too, no side effects were reported.

In a recent carry out study (Schuller und Galle 2007) the clinical effect of electronically stored nosodes was tested on patients with rheumatic diseases in the frame of the exogenic bioresonance therapy. The results were positive. The electric skin conduction of the terminal acupuncture points reduced significantly by the verum treatment. The placebo treatment did not show any significant results. The mean subjective state of health, the sedimentation of the blood cells, the mean calcium value and the redox potential of the blood improved significantly. The other biochemical parameters and the cellular parameters of the blood indicated no or only slight changes.

Korenbaum et al. 2006 proved in a double-blind trial a significant difference between the absorption spectra of electronic copies of homeopathic nosodes and placebos in the range of 700 to 800 nm. [Korenbaum VI, Chernysheva TN, Apukhtina TP, Sovetnikova LN: Absorption spectra of electronic-homeopathic copies of homeopathic nosodes and placebo have essential differences. Forsch Komplementärmed 2006;13:294-297.] The production of the electronic copies is essentially equal to the electronic storage of bioactive substances on water-alcohol-mixture done by the bioresonance method.

The study from Uellendahl in 2008 gives evidence for the efficacy of the MORA-ColorTherapy in patients with chronic functional pain in the system of movement. The MORAColor-Therapy is a combination of endogenous bioresonance therapy and electronic color therapy. It was a retrospective, comparative study with patients doing sports and non-sports. The subjective pain-score improved in 96% of the patients of the sports group significantly and in the non-sports group in 66% of the patients. The difference between the sports and non-sports group were significant.

A retrospective, longitudinal cohort study with the bioresonance method (561 case reports) was published by Rahlfs and Rozehnal (2008). In order to investigate the clinical effectiveness, they assessed the experiences of physicians and nonmedical practitioners made with the bioresonance therapy in 14 fields of indications. The therapists described in a standardized case report form cases that had been treated with bioresonance. The effectiveness of bioresonance therapy was judged to be satisfactory to very good in 92.4% of the cases. This overall positive judgment pervades in all examined fields of indications. A good or even a very good tolerability was described in 94.7% of the cases.

The fields of indication were: Acute and chronic infections, diseases of the respiratory tract, cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, tumors, gastroenteric diseases, liver diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, endocrine diseases, injuries, pain, menstruation complaints, teeth diseases.

Summary of all the human clinical studies of bioresonance therapy that were known until 2008  

 Institute für Biophysik. Prof. Fritz-Albert Popp, Published 2008

Summary of all the human clinical studies of bioresonance therapy that were known until 2008

Indication Author Title Journal Scientific design Scientific database
Rheumatic conditions E.F.

Gogoleva

New approaches to diagnosis and treatment of fibromyalgia in spinal osteochondrosis

 

Ter Arkh 73

(4),

40- 45, 2001

 

In Russian, German

translation available

Controlled (comparative)

study, N = 30

 

Institute for Outpatient

Treatment;

State Medical

Academy,

Orenburg

 

 

Medline index, peer-reviewed
O. Maiko,

E.F.

Gogoleva

Outpatient bioresonance treatment of Gonarthrosis

 

Ter Arkh 72

(12), 50-53,

2000

 

In Russian, German

translation available

Controlled (comparative)

study, N = 35

 

Institute for Outpatient

Treatment;

State Medical

Academy,

Orenburg

 

 

Medline index, peer-reviewed
B.I. Islamov et al.

 

 

Effect of bioresonance therapy on antioxidant system in lymphocytes in patients with

rheumatoid

arthritis

Bull. Exp.

Biol. Med.

134 (3), 248-

250, 2002

Controlled study,

N = 20

 

Institute for

Theoretical and

Experimental

Biophysics and Institute for

Rheumatology, Russian Academy of

Science

 

Medline index, peer-reviewed
B.I. Islamov et al. Bioresonance therapy of rheumatoid arthritis and heat shock proteins Bull. Exp.

Biol. Med.

128 (11), 1112-1115, 1999

Controlled study,

N = 6

 

Institute for

Theoretical and

Experimental

Biophysics and Institute for

Rheumatology, Russian Academy of

Science

 

 

Medline index, peer-reviewed
Schuller, J. Galle, M. Study of the clinical effects of electronically stored nosodes from tooth diseases and articular rheumatism in persons with rheumatic diseases Forsch.

Komplemen-

tärmed. 2007; 14:289-296.

partly controlled

study, N = 21

 

Medical practice study, Graz

Medline index, peer-reviewed

 

Indication Author Title Journal Scientific design Scientific database

 

Allergies/

Intolerances

P. Schumacher 1.Bioresonanztherapie von Allergien und Unverträglichkeiten

(1990)

[Bioresonance therapy of allergies

and intolerance]

 

2.Bioresonanztherapie der Pollinose (1991) [Bioresonance therapy of hay fever]

 

Not a journal

publication;

 

published in: Biophysikalische Therapie der Allergien,  p.

149ff,

Sonntag-Verlag,

Stuttgart 1998

 

 

 

2 prospective, Non-controlled,

N = 164 (1990),

N = 115 (1991)

 

Medical practice

study, Innsbruck

 

 

A.V.

Chervinskaya et al.

 

MORA therapy

for respiratory and allergic diseases

(1997)

Not a journal

publication

 

In Russian, German

translation available

Controlled

(comparative) Study, all documentation available,  N = 56

 

University of

St. Petersburg, Clinical Science

Centre of

St. Petersburg

 

 

J. Hennecke Energetische

Allergietherapie: Möglichkeiten und Erfahrungen mit der Bicom-

Bioresonanztherapie [Energy therapy of

Ärztezeitschr. f.

Naturh.verf. 35

(6), 427-432,

1994

 

Retrospective observational study, N = 200

 

Medical practice study

Amed index

 

allergies:

Possibilities of and experience with Bicom bioresonance therapy]

 

 

H. Kofler et al.

(see comment in Galle 2002)

Bioresonanz bei

Pollinose

[Bioresonance in hay fever]
Allergologie 19

(3), 114-122, 1996

Controlled (placebo-

controlled) study, N = 42

 

University of Innsbruck

Dermatology Clinic

 

Medline index, peer-reviewed
M. H. Schöni et al. Efficacy Trial of

Bioresonance in Children with atopic dermatitis

Int. Arch. Allergy

Immunol. 112,

238-246, 1997

Controlled (comparative, placebo-

controlled) study, N = 16

 

Alpines children’s hospital, Davos

 

Medline index, peer-reviewed
C.F. Cheng et al. A study to evaluate the efficacy of bioresonance therapy of MORA  device on allergic symptoms

(2008)

 

 

Not a journal publication Non-controlled

study, N = 32

 

Danshuei Township

Public Health Center,

Taipei County,

Taiwan

C.F. Cheng et al. A study to evaluate the efficacy of electronic homeopathic remedies on allergic symptoms

(2008)

 

 

Not a journal publication Non-controlled

study, N = 32

 

Danshuei Township

Public Health Center,

Taipei County,

Taiwan

S. Huang et al. Klinische

Behandlung vom allergischen

Schnupfen und

Bronchialasthma der Kinder mit dem Bioresonanztherapiegerät

[Clinical treatment of allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma in children with the

bioresonance device]

 

Zhejiang Medical

Journal 2005; 27(6):457-458

 

In Chinese, German

translation

available

 

Controlled, comparative

study, N = 181

 

The first public

hospital, Tonglu,

China

J. Yang, L. Zhang 300 Behandlungsbeispiele gegen Asthma mittels

BICOM-Grätes für die Kinderpatienten [300 Examples of

Maternal and Child Health Care of China 2004; 19(9):126-127

 

In Chinese,

Controlled, comparative

study,  N= 300

 

Center of  research of the children’s hospital

 

treatment of asthma with the bioresonance device in children] German

translation

available

 

 

in  Jinan, China
M. Xu et al. Klinische

Beobachtung der Behandlung vom chronischen

Nesselausschlag mit dem Bioresonanztherapiegerät. [Clinical observation of the treatment of chronic urticaria with the bioresonance device]

 

China Journal of

Leprosy and Skin

Diseases 2005; 21(7):533-534

 

In Chinese, German

translation

available

 

 

Non-controlled

study, N = 56

 

Research Institute of  Dermatology and vein diseases in Shandong, China

Y. Feng et al. Die Neulich Klinische

Beobachtung der

Heilwirkung mit Bioresonanztherapiegerät in 150 Fällen der KinderAllergiekrankheit [Newly clinical observation of the effectiveness of the bioresonance therapy in 150 children

allergic diseases]

 

Chinese Journal of Contemporary

Pediatrics 2005; 7(3):257-258

 

In Chinese, German

translation

available

 

Non-controlled

study, N = 150

 

Medical ClinicAcademy of the  Shandong University, Jinan,

China

X. Zhang et al. Klinische

Beobachtung über 54 Behandlungsfälle gegen

Nesselausschlag mittels BICOM Bioresonanztherapiegerät

[Clinical observation in 54 cases with urticaria by the

bioresonance device]

 

China Journal of

Leprosy and Skin

Diseases 2005;

21(8):651

 

In Chinese, German

translation

available

 

Non-controlled

study, N = 54

 

Children-Clinic of Shanxi, Section of Dermatology,

Taiyuan, China

X. Du et al. Klinische

Beobachtung über 79 Behandlungsfälle gegen allergische Hautkrankheiten mittels

Bioresonanzgerät

[Clinical observations in 79 cases of allergic skin diseases by the

bioresonance device]

 

Chinese Journal of Practice Medicine 2005;

4(5):259

 

In Chinese, German

translation

available

 

Non-controlled

study, N = 79

 

Children Hospital Jinan, Shandong,

China

 

Indication Author Title Journal Scientific design Scientific database

 

Functional

Gastrointestinal

symptoms

(functional oesophageal symptoms,

irritable stomach, irritable colon, etc.)

 

 

 

J.

Nienhaus,

M. Galle

 

Wirkung einer standardisierten

MORA-Biore-

sonanztherapie

auf funktionelle

Magen-DarmBeschwerden

(2003) [Effect of

standardized MORA bioresonance therapy on functional gastrointestinal symptoms]

Forschende Komplementärmedizin 2006;13-

28-34

Controlled (placebocontrolled) study with all case reports, N = 20

 

Medical practice study, Mühlheim

Medline-Index, Peer-reviewed
Obstructive airways diseases (bronchial asthma, etc.)

 

 

 

B.P.

Saweljew et al.

Bioresonanztherapie bei der komplexen Therapie von Kindern mit Asthma bronchiale [Bioresonance therapy in the complex treatment of children with bronchial asthma] Medizinischwissenschaftliche und Lernmethodische Zeitschrift N2, June 2001, p.

111-130

 

German

translation available

Placebocontrolled

study, N = 23

 

Institute of

Paediatrics,

Moscow

Published after submission of dissertations
W. I.

Trofimow et al.

 

MORA-Therapie bei obstruktiven Atemwegserkrankungen

(1997)

[MORA therapy of obstructive airways diseases]
Not a journal

publication

 

In Russian, German

translation available

Controlled (comparative) study, all documentation available,  N = 35

 

University of

St. Petersburg, Clinical Science Centre of St.

Petersburg

S. Huang et al. Klinische

Behandlung vom allergischen

Schnupfen und

Bronchialasthma der Kinder mit dem Bioresonanztherapiegerät

[Clinical treatment of allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma in children with the

bioresonance device]

 

Zhejiang Medical

Journal 2005; 27(6):457-458

 

In Chinese, German

translation

available

 

Controlled, comparative

study, N = 181

 

The first public

hospital, Tonglu,

China

J. Yang, L. Zhang 300 Behandlungsbeispiele gegen Asthma mittels

BICOM-Grätes für die Kinderpatienten [300 Examples of

Maternal and Child Health Care of China 2004; 19(9):126-127

 

In Chinese,

Controlled, comparative

study,  N= 300

 

Center of  research of the childrens hospital

treatment of asthma with the bioresonance device in children] German

translation

available

 

 

in  Jinan, China
Overuse syndrome in elite athletes B.J. Papcz, J. Barpvic Clinical study on the use of the

Bicom Resonance Therapy with the syndrome of high-performance athletes

Published in EHK

1999, 48 (7), 449-

450 under the title:

Einsatz biophysikalischer Frequenzverfahren beim Überlastungssyndrom von Leistungssportlern

[Use of biophysical frequency techniques in

overuse syndrome

in elite athletes]

 

Controlled (comparative) study, N = 12

 

Study Hospital

Maribor, Slovenia

Amed index

 

Indication Author Title Journal Scientific design Scientific database
Liver dysfunction R. Machowinski, P. Kreisl Prospektive randomi- sierte Studie zur

Überprüfung der Behandlungserfolge mit patienteneigenen elektromagnetischen Feldern (BICOM) bei Leberfunktionsstörungen [Prospective randomised study to verify therapeutic successes with patients’ own electromagnetic fields (BICOM) in

liver dysfunction]

 

Not a journal Publikation,

 

In: Wissenschaftliche Studien zur Bicom Resonanz-therapie, p.

77-92, Institute for Regulatory Me-dicine,

Gräfelfing, 1999

 

 

 

Controlled (comparative)

study, N = 14

 

Medical practice study

 

 

 

 

Psychosoma-tic disorders J. Nienhaus Studie zur The- rapie psychosomatischer Beschwer- den mit MORA

[Study of the treatment of psychosomatic

disorders with

MORA]

 

 

Not a journal

publication,

 

In:

MORA und

Psychosomatik, p. 65-

74, Med-Tronik, Friesen-heim 1999

 

 

One-arm, prospective

study, N = 79

 

Medical practice study

 

 

 

 

 

Stuttering A. Wille Bioresonanztherapie

(biophysikalische Informationstherapie) bei stotternden Kinder [Bioresonance therapy (biophysical information therapy)

in stuttering children]

 

 

Forsch. Komplementärmed. 6, suppl. 1,

50-52, 1999

Controlled

Study

(comparative), N = 14

 

 

Medline index, peerreviewed
  
Functional pain in the musculoskeletal system U.

Uellendahl

Darstellung der

MORA-Color-

Methode in der Behandlung von chronischen funktionellen

Schmerzen am Bewegungsapparat.

[The MORA-Color-

therapy in the treatment of chronic

functional pain in the

moving system]

 

Rigorosearbeit zum Dr. päd. an der

Sportwissenschaftlichen

Fakultät der Universität

Bratislava, 2008

 

In preparation for publication

Retrospective, comparative

study, N = 100

 

Medical practice study

  
Many fields of indications

(Infections, respiratory tract, cardiovascular, autoimmun, tumors, gastroentero, liver,

musculoskeletal,

endokrinum,

injuries, pain, menstruation, teeth)

 

 

V.W. Rahlfs, A.

Rozehnal

Wirksamkeit und

Verträglichkeit der Bioresonanzbehandlung [Efficacy and tolerability of bioresonance treatment]

Erfahrungs-heilkunde 2008; 57(8):462-468 Retrolektiv, longitudinal cohort study, N = 541

 

idv-

Datenanalyse und Versuchsplanung, Gauting,

Deutschland

 

 

 

 

Additional comments

All of the studies, except those by Kofler et al., Schöni et al. and Wille, document the effectiveness of the bioresonance method. This is why in some countries, yet in particular in Russia,  bioresonance therapy is reimbursed by the statutory health insurance funds.

Regarding the “negative” studies, there is currently a huge need for discussion, presented all too briefly below:

  1. Re Kofler et al.:

For a detailed comment, see M. Galle, MORA-Bioresonanztherapie … und es funktioniert doch! [MORA Bioresonance therapy … and it does work!], ProMedicina-Verlag, 2002, p. 212-221. In my opinion, the study can be interpreted as positive, at least in parts.

  1. Re Schöni et al.:

This study has not yet been discussed in detail and critiqued by us. The most important methodological errors, in my opinion, are:

a)The concomitant administration of highly active medicinal products (e.g. antibiotics, corticosteroids) in the bioresonance therapy group and the control group reduces the effect of bioresonance, according to therapeutic experience to date.

b)The statistical data analysis seems inappropriate. For two (total Costa score and pruritus score) out of the three most important end-points, bioresonance therapy achieved a two to three times greater effect than the control treatment. Therefore, a clear mean improvement was achieved by the bioresonance therapy in comparison to the control treatment. According to Schöni et al., however, this is not significant at the 5% level. The spread is extremely wide. Wilcoxon does not seem to be an appropriate statistical test here. Admittedly, to make meaningful statistical suggestions, the original data situation has to be examined carefully. Unfortunately, however, the original data are not available to me.

The improvement brought about by the bioresonance therapy is at least a tendential effect – even according to the analysis by Schöni et al. –, which points to the effectiveness of the bioresonance therapy.  However, Schöni et al. stress only what was negative for bioresonance therapy in this study. They make no mention of the positive. They do not discuss the results neutrally.

It seems to me that Schöni et al. use the statistics inappropriately to obscure the effect of the bioresonance therapy. This assumption appears reasonable based on their biased discussion.

 

 

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